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Yakuts

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Chieftain
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    Posted: 26 Dec 2010 at 02:47
The Yakuts are a Turkic-speaking people living in eastern Siberian. Despite their language, they have little in common with other Turkic peoples. To begin with, they have never come under the influence of Islam and the religion they practice today is Orthodox Christianity with certain shamanistic traditions.
Their livelihood mostly depends on the reering of raindeer that provided them with meat and clothing.
In all external aspects, they have more in common with other Siberian native populations such as Evenki or Khanti-Mansi  than with Central Asian Turks.

Currently they make up under a half Yakutia, with the other half made up of Russians. I've seen a report that due to the rich minerals, the region is undergoing an economic boom and many immigrants, both from inside and outside of Russia, have gone there to look for a new life. Among the non-Russians, Central Asians such as Uzbeks are the largest nationality.

It would be interesting to see the cultural and demographic evolution of Yakutia in the following years and decades as Yakuts, Russians, and Central Asians live and work together.




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Sarmat View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Sarmat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Dec 2010 at 05:03
Originally posted by calvo calvo wrote:

The Yakuts are a Turkic-speaking people living in eastern Siberian. Despite their language, they have little in common with other Turkic peoples. To begin with, they have never come under the influence of Islam and the religion they practice today is Orthodox Christianity with certain shamanistic traditions.
Their livelihood mostly depends on the reering of raindeer that provided them with meat and clothing.
In all external aspects, they have more in common with other Siberian native populations such as Evenki or Khanti-Mansi  than with
 
That's not complitely true.  Yakuts are divided into northern and southern ones and while northern Yakuts are more or less similar to Siberian natives, southern Yakuts were traditionally nomadic mostly relying on herding and horse breeding. They also had heavy cavalry and were famous for excellent iron swords and armour manufacturing.
 
Besides, not all the Turkic tribes were under the influence of Islam. Notable Turkic nomades like Khakases, Tuvan and Altaians never were under Islamic influence.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Jams Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Dec 2010 at 22:37
It's not 50/50% Sakha/Russians, since there are other ethnicities in Yakutia than Sakha and Russians. Individually those peoples are very few, but put together they're somewhat significant, I'd say around 12-14% of the population. The statistics also only show how people identify or something like that, but there are lots of mixed Russian/Sakha people there too.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Anton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Dec 2010 at 07:10
Originally posted by Sarmat Sarmat wrote:

 
That's not complitely true.  Yakuts are divided into northern and southern ones and while northern Yakuts are more or less similar to Siberian natives lots of , southern Yakuts were traditionally nomadic mostly relying on herding and horse breeding. They also had heavy cavalry and were famous for excellent iron swords and armour manufacturing.



Although they still keep hourse breeding and use hourses as major sourse of meat, they do not need to move from place to place as there is lots of food around. As far as I know, they were not nomads for centuries. So, it is actually northern reindeer breeders that were/still are nomadic. I've tried their hourse meat, it's surprisingly fatty because Sakha people do not ride their them, and because they obviously need good termo-isolation. They are also quite hairy for the same reason:

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote calvo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Dec 2010 at 07:45
Originally posted by Sarmat Sarmat wrote:

 
That's not complitely true.  Yakuts are divided into northern and southern ones and while northern Yakuts are more or less similar to Siberian natives, southern Yakuts were traditionally nomadic mostly relying on herding and horse breeding. They also had heavy cavalry and were famous for excellent iron swords and armour manufacturing.
 
Besides, not all the Turkic tribes were under the influence of Islam. Notable Turkic nomades like Khakases, Tuvan and Altaians never were under Islamic influence.


Do the northern and southern Yakuts live next to each other or separated by a large distance? Are the climatic conditions different?
When did the Yakuts as a nation first come into recorded history, and by whom? The Chinese, Russians, or Muslims?

I remember reading somewhere that in Yakutia, not only have some Yakuts assimilated into Russian society, some Russians have also assimilated into Yakut society.

I thought that Khakass, Tuvan, and Altainians were Mongol, rather than Turkic peoples, probably because that they're Buddhist.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Sarmat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Dec 2010 at 11:51
Khakasses and Altaians aren't Bugghists they mostly keep their original Shamanistic believes, similar to Yakuts.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Sarmat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Dec 2010 at 01:14
Originally posted by calvo calvo wrote:


Do the northern and southern Yakuts live next to each other or separated by a large distance? Are the climatic conditions different?
 
Yes. The climatic conditions are different of course. Climate in the middle basin of Lena river still allowed Yakuts to maintain traditional Central Asian type of nomadic herding. Northern Yakuts, however, reached as far as Northern Arctic region were the most appropriate way of economic life was deer herding that they adopted from Tunguses (Evenks). Northern Yakuts are much more close to Evenks and other natives of Arctic north in their traditional life than to Central Asian nomades.

Originally posted by calvo calvo wrote:


When did the Yakuts as a nation first come into recorded history, and by whom? The Chinese, Russians, or Muslims?
 
Apparently, Yakuts as a nation were first "discovered" by Russians in the 17th century. Their ancestors are believed to be Turkic Kurykans tribes that had originally lived in the Baikal region and were pushed to the north by Mongolic tribes in approximately 11th century AD. They also absorbed other Turkic component like Kypchaks and later mixed with local tribes, mostly Evenks (Tungus),  Kurykans were famous for their metal works and Yakuts mainained that tradition. Russian Cossacks in the 17th centuries noted that "Yakut steel is better than German one."

Originally posted by calvo calvo wrote:


I remember reading somewhere that in Yakutia, not only have some Yakuts assimilated into Russian society, some Russians have also assimilated into Yakut society.
 
Yes, there is a notable metis group, kind of a middle between Yakuts and Russians called "Yakutians or Sakhaliars." They are, basically, a mixture between Yakuts and Russians.


Edited by Sarmat - 28 Dec 2010 at 01:20
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Anton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Dec 2010 at 04:03
Originally posted by Sarmat Sarmat wrote:

 
Yes. The climatic conditions are different of course. Climate in the middle basin of Lena river still allowed Yakuts to maintain traditional Central Asian type of nomadic herding.


Sarmat, believe me, its not nomadic! My wife is one of those Sakhalyars, I have, sort of, first-hand information ;)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Sarmat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Dec 2010 at 04:14
Well. Nowdays, it's not nomadic. I assume we are talking in general. It was nomadic 100 years ago.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote calvo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Dec 2010 at 06:39
Originally posted by Anton Anton wrote:



Sarmat, believe me, its not nomadic! My wife is one of those Sakhalyars, I have, sort of, first-hand information ;)


Do "Sakhalyars" form a significant percentage of the population of Yakutia? Do they generally identify more with Russians or with Yakuts? What is their first language?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Anton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Dec 2010 at 08:57
Well, they are pretty numerous, but I have never heard of any statistics. Some of them identify theemselves as Russians (especially those who live outside Yakutia), some as Yakuts. They all speak Russian and almost certainly Yakutian as well. Although in big cities like Yakutsk or Mirniy, many people speak only Russian. Majority of Yakutiansspeak Russian, although there are exceptions. My father-in-law for instance is veeery bad in Russian.
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