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World's Strongest Empires: A Timeline

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Simonforest Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Apr 2011 at 23:17
Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

Agustin Iturbide created an "empire" even named it and made himself its emperor, but I doubt there are people around speaking of the Mexican Empire and discussing it seriously. Dom Joao VI "made" Brazil a kingdom and his son Pedro I declared it an "empire" but all was little more than exercises in nomenclature over an amorphous territory. Are we now to classify Brazil as an "empire"? I do not think so and for the very reason the United States of America is not an empire. Institutional permanence and not evanescent nomenclature sets actual definition. hence from 1565 to 1917 one may properly speak of the Russian Empire, and in a sense continue it into the middle 1950s despite the blather about federated republics, yet consequently the notion of an "imperial ethos" becomes more than problematic.
 
 
 
I'm afraid I don't quite follow the thread of your argument over the classification of America as and empire. I am aware that the definition of empire is problematic; that is why we are considering it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Qymaen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Apr 2011 at 01:45
 British Empires is one of them. Here is the list of timeline from 18th - 20th century

British Empire Timeline links:





I will list more of the strongest Empires timelines in here. Tongue


Edited by Qymaen - 16 Apr 2011 at 01:48
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Apr 2011 at 11:42
Still no definition! Why is everyone skirting internal constructs and political nomenclature set within the appropriate times? Just as done above, I could classify as follows:
 
16th Century Spanish Empires
17th Century Spanish Empires
18th Century Spanish Empires
19th Century Spanish Empires
 
And all would still remain meaningless because the conditionals for discussion are steadfastly ignored, specially within the context of juridical and administrative cognizance.


Edited by drgonzaga - 03 May 2011 at 03:59
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote opuslola Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2011 at 00:44
"Still no definition! Why is everyone skirting internal constructs and political nomenclature set within the appropriate times?"

Because they can Doctor! Limits present limits upon the respondant.

No, limits, equals no limits upon what one might respond. But, even with limits, at one time the combined Spanish/Austrian alliance?, might have emcompassed the most power?

Regards,
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 May 2011 at 13:12
I see the Caterpillar has escaped Wonderland.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote opuslola Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 May 2011 at 14:30
Good to be back Doctor. Yes I was confined within a cocoon for a short period but the metamorphisis is now complete to its first part. I am now a Bombyz mori, and looking for a mate or three. LOL

Maybe my spinning days are over? But I have it seems about a mile of good spin left.

Time is of course short.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 May 2011 at 18:19
Not short enough, unfortunately.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote opuslola Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 May 2011 at 18:06
"et tu Graham?"

Thanks for putting up with me Doctor.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 May 2011 at 19:02
Originally posted by opuslola opuslola wrote:

"et tu Graham?"
What's that supposed to refer to?
Citizen of Ankh-Morpork.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote opuslola Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 May 2011 at 02:20
Originally posted by gcle2003 gcle2003 wrote:

Originally posted by opuslola opuslola wrote:

"et tu Graham?"

What's that supposed to refer to?


I don't know Graham, just how is your Latin?

Just what does it mean to you?

I say potatoe and drgonzaga says potato, et tu?

I do not threaten you, do I? Et tu?

I just love using question marks.

It seems you do also. re. your statement, "What's that supposed to refer to?"

Touche'", my friend.

P.S., It means that do you wish for my early demise as does the good Doctor? Do you need an English translation.

Regards,

Edited by opuslola - 13 May 2011 at 02:31
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 May 2011 at 02:40
Originally posted by opuslola opuslola wrote:

"et tu Graham?"


Interesting. Every time I see Latin quotes I get more convinced Spanish is just a popular simplification (or vulgar form) of classical Latin.

In Spanish "et tu" is "y tu"... Confused
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote opuslola Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 May 2011 at 03:14
Actually I tend to feel that the so called "classical Latin" is the invention, much like Esperanto, abeit confined to the 14th-16th centuries.

Y tu?
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Edited by opuslola - 13 May 2011 at 03:15
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 May 2011 at 03:26
Seneca wrote in Rome, and his Latin is classical.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote opuslola Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 May 2011 at 18:20
In my opinion, if indeed Seneca ever existed, he existed in the 13th to the 17th century CE.

But, of course, I could well be incorrect?

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 May 2011 at 04:02
Of course you are wrong. Seneca was the advisor of Nero.
I know because Seneca was born in Spain, and he is considered part of our culture, somehow.


Edited by pinguin - 14 May 2011 at 04:03
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote shenglu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Sep 2011 at 01:24
They do not have the other half of the world the power of interaction. My point is, including their need for a more complex charts. As you said there are two discrete regions
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote spiceman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Oct 2012 at 05:28
In reading the post I question or pose two opening thoughts. 
In history one talks of empires and dynasties almost as one in the same.  In many ways one is the other but not always true.  While great empires have great dynasties ruling them and great dynasties some times form great empires. 

A great empire is the product of its roots in history.


OK with those thoughts in mind I wonder what is consider great or strong.  Land mass controlled, army strength, people conquered, historical future effected, remembrance, independence/sovereignty. good vs. bad?

Alexander, Attila the Hun, Hitler established "empires" depending on view points they were good or bad but none the less great for the period existence and very strong for what was achieved.

I view even nations of history some we know little or discount were great or strong in there own right.  For instance Hohokam and Anasazi or as a whole the Ancient Pueblo people.  We seem to focus on more on Europe, Asia, and part of Africa. 



WIKI-- "The term empire derives from the Latin imperium (power, authority). Politically, an empire is a geographically extensive group of states and peoples (ethnic groups) united and ruled either by a monarch (emperor, empress) or an oligarchy"






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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ancient historia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Oct 2012 at 10:01
An Empire is a political construct in which one state dominates over another state, or a series of states. At its heart, an empire is ruled by an emperor, even though many states in History without an Emperor at their head are called "empires".

At its core, an empire is the domination of one state by another. This idea lies at the heart of the common use of the term ‘empire’ and is as old as state-building itself. The earliest city-states tried to grow by taking over their neighbours. Where they succeeded, a single larger state might form, but more often the aggressor became a core state holding sway over a number of semi-independent peripheral states – a halfway stage to a larger state. This core state became more than merely the strongest in the region.

Sparta was the leader of a league of states but had little interest in interfering with their domestic politics. Athens, by contrast, also led a league but forced a supervised Athenian-style Democracy on its supposedly independent members. Sparta was a hegemonic state, the strongest of a group, while Athens was interventionist and thereby imperial. The fact that Athens replaced tyrants with democratic government did not affect the imperial nature of this relationship.

An empire is an unequal relationship between a core state and a periphery of one or more states controlled from the core. On the simplest level, control means military occupation or other formal political intervention, but it can also cover informal economic or cultural influence. Economic pressure by itself has frequently been enough to manipulate governments. Religion, ideology or other cultural forces have habitually accompanied political or economic persuasion.

The culture of the periphery, however, can exert its own pull and threaten to absorb a conquering power, most famously in the case of the Mongol Conquest of China. As such, cultural imperialism is not a necessary component of empire.

In fact, neither is cultural difference per se, given the difficulty of deciding where one culture ends and another begins. In the modern era, the borders of the nation state have tried to settle this matter, but the nation state itself formed around a core state that standardized language and other aspects of culture in a way that typically alienated outlying regions. In the end, the acid test for cultural identity has remained solidarity in the face of a common enemy and this is a test most empires have at some stage passed.

To explain how empires, thus defined, have risen, persisted and fallen over the millennia, the core, the periphery and the international situation each need to be examined.

The core state is the place to look to find various motives for expansion, from the dream of imposing an imperial peace on squabbling states to the desire for economic exploitation, lust for the glory of conquest or zeal for evangelism, religious or ideological.

The periphery is the place to look for crucial resistance or collaboration. Specifically, the fates of many empires have hinged on peripheral leaders deciding where their best interests lay. Often, the core can provide an account of an empire’s rise, while the periphery better explains its persistence.

Examples of Empires in the Ancient world include those of Sumeria, Babylonia, Goguryeo, Inca, Assyria, that of the Hittites, the Egyptian, the Persian, the Macedonian and, most famously, the Roman.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ancient historia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Oct 2012 at 10:28
I strongly argue that it should be divided into several regions; Africa, East Asia, Central & North Asia, Europe, Southwest Asia, India, Southeast Asia, America.

Like the one below.

5th century
-Europe: Hunnic empire
-Central Asia: Hunnic empire
-Southwest Asia: Sassanid empire
-East Asia: Goguryeo empire
-India: Gupta empire
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Picard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Dec 2012 at 21:29
Originally posted by Omar al Hashim Omar al Hashim wrote:

Rome fell in 476 and Byzantium in 1453.
 
However the end of Roman power and dominance was really around 640/650 when they lost the majority of their territory to the Arab invasions.
 
What your missing here is geographic distinctions. In 1600, no-one in Eastern Europe/Middle East could rival the Ottomans, no-one in America could rival Spain, no-one in India could rival the Mughals, no-one could rival Bornu in the Sahel, and well, the Qing were rivalling the Ming in China.

Actually, Roman Empire survived quite some time after these losses, and during Basil II's reign was probably the dominant power in the Europe, or at least one of dominant powers.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Penelope Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Dec 2012 at 04:30
After completely subjugated another empire(bulgaria), no european would have been stupid enough to challenge him. 
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