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Last Slave Ship

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    Posted: 27 Dec 2018 at 14:53
An amazing development here in my view. There was an interview with a survivor of the slave trade and its been unpublished! The author, Zora Thurston uses phonetic sounds, to capture something of the sound or manner in Cudjo Lewis' speech. Apparently that is what has kept the work from being published. 

Author Zora Neale Hurston (1903-1960).
Roughly 60 years after the abolition of slavery, anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston made an incredible connection: She located the last surviving captive of the last slave ship to bring Africans to the United States.
Hurston’s book tells the story of Cudjo Lewis, who was born in what is now the West African country of Benin. Originally named Kossula, he was only 19 years old when members of the neighboring Dahomian tribe captured him and took him to the coast. There, he and about 120 others were sold into slavery and crammed onto the Clotilda, the last slave ship to reach the continental United States.

Hurston’s use of vernacular dialogue in both her novels and her anthropological interviews was often controversial, as some black American thinkers at the time argued that this played to black caricatures in the minds of white people. Hurston disagreed, and refused to change Lewis’ dialect—which was one of the reasons a publisher turned her manuscript down back in the 1930s.

Many decades later, her principled stance means that modern readers will get to hear Lewis’ story the way that he told it.


“The United Nations is the biggest joke of this century. If each one is trying to assert his own rights there, how can there be a United Nations?” UG Krishnamurti
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote franciscosan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Jan 2019 at 03:44
Is that bad luck, to be on the last slave ship?  Or would have been captured for the Arabian market?  Or something else happen to him otherwise?  It is good that Hurston copied it down, however she copied it down.  It sounds like she did not clean it up which strikes me as a good thing, but I don't really know the nature of the debate.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vanuatu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Jan 2019 at 10:52
Originally posted by franciscosan franciscosan wrote:

Is that bad luck, to be on the last slave ship?  Or would have been captured for the Arabian market?  Or something else happen to him otherwise?  It is good that Hurston copied it down, however she copied it down.  It sounds like she did not clean it up which strikes me as a good thing, but I don't really know the nature of the debate.
If the reasons for denying the historical truth include people such as Richard Wright I can see was Hurston was denied publication of her master work. It's every bit the disgrace of the Vatican and heresy.

  
When Hurston tried to get Barracoon published in 1931, she couldn’t find a taker. There was concern among “black intellectuals and political leaders” that the book laid uncomfortably bare Africans’ involvement in the slave trade, according to novelist Alice Walker’s foreword to the book, which is finally being published in May. Walker is responsible for reintroducing the world to a forgotten Zora Neale Hurston, who’d died penniless and alone in 1960, in a 1975 Ms. magazine essay. As Walker writes, “Who would want to know, via a blow-by-blow account, how African chiefs deliberately set out to capture Africans from neighboring tribes, to provoke wars of conquest in order to capture for the slave trade. This is, make no mistake, a harrowing read.”

Read "Barracoon" free

“I want to know who you are,” she approached Kossola, “and how you came to be a slave; and to what part of Africa do you belong, and how you fared as a slave, and how you have managed as a free man?” Kossola absorbed her every question, then raised a tearful countenance. “Thankee Jesus! Somebody come ast about Cudjo! I want tellee somebody who I is, so maybe dey go in de Afficky soil some day and callee my name and somebody say, ‘Yeah, I know Kossula.’” 2



Edited by Vanuatu - 02 Jan 2019 at 11:13
“The United Nations is the biggest joke of this century. If each one is trying to assert his own rights there, how can there be a United Nations?” UG Krishnamurti
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote franciscosan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Jan 2019 at 11:46
I heard a review awhile back on Fresh Air, the interview show on NPR (national public radio (USA)), they do music and book reviews in addition to the interview.

So would you want to be a Van Gogh who sold nothing in his lifetime, and became famous after?  or would you want to be popular in your lifetime, and forgotten afterward?  Not that we necessarily have a choice which kind of life we live.  I think the romantic view is to be a starving artist, dedicated to one's work.  Of course, many starving artists (or adjunct instructors) also don't do anything worthwhile in the long term either.  Great story, the rediscovery of her interview of Kossula, and a worthy topic.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vanuatu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Jan 2019 at 13:07
Van Gogh should have sold a great deal of art, he was an inspiration to a group of immortals at Corman's studio in Paris. Emile Bernard, Matisse, Toulouse-Lautrec, Gaugin and he had his brother Theo an art dealer! Van Gogh is weird about lots of things and eating oil paints didn't help. If he had not messed up so publicly with the ear stunt it may have been a different ending altogether. 

I can live an anonymous life bc it at least allows me some peace and some happy times. VG seems like he was entirely miserable even as he is praised by other artists. Cudjo Lewis reads like he has a more hopeful spirit than Van Gogh!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote franciscosan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Jan 2019 at 14:08
Nietzsche was not well known in his life time, or rather until he went insane and his sister (a nazi) started promoting him.
I was thinking of Zora Neale Hurston, and Cudjo Lewis.  I think the interview with Hurston would have been a great personal triumph for Cudjo Lewis.  The delay in discovery of the manuscript was unfortunate not for Lewis, but for Hurston.

But, there is a whole cottage industry of finding lost manuscripts from "disadvantaged" people and promoting them, some of which deserve promotion.  Don't get me wrong, Hurston seems quite worthy of attention, but others less so.  It is like feminists searching for a female Shakespeare.

There is an idea that the genius suffers for his art, Van Gogh fits that fairly well, Nietzsche also, Zora Neale Huston too?  I don't know enough about her.


Edited by franciscosan - 04 Jan 2019 at 14:12
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Jan 2019 at 13:46
So far, only African slaves have been mentioned in this post.

Don't forget about the thousands of Irish (and some English) who were taken to the Caribbean and sold as slaves.

Convicts transported to New South Wales and Van Dieman's land were also sent into servitude as unpaid labour for the wealthy. It was upon their backs that the country was built.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote chaudblaze Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Jan 2019 at 17:06
do you know what the Christians are? I don't know why you said 19 I have no idea what that means, for him, where he was, on gregorian?
so like but uhm, you don'tknow Legacy of King Richard? that kind of thing?

What is, who's abolishing where? Governments didn't have, I mean HOUSEs, it's outlaw based on reference. Even the 70's was like that...

I dont' think there was  a last slave ship, people get stolen all the time. It sounds like a faked story.
unedited, I trust myself
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Your posts appear to be spam. 

I note that you have been blocked by other services for spam.

You are now warned, and if you persist, you will be blocked.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vanuatu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Jan 2019 at 06:45
Originally posted by toyomotor toyomotor wrote:

So far, only African slaves have been mentioned in this post.

Don't forget about the thousands of Irish (and some English) who were taken to the Caribbean and sold as slaves.

Convicts transported to New South Wales and Van Dieman's land were also sent into servitude as unpaid labour for the wealthy. It was upon their backs that the country was built.
Its really about the only interview that I know of with a captive of the slave trade in the 1860's. The slave ship "Clotilde" was roaming the west African shores after slave trade was internationally outlawed in 1858 & 1859. Cudjo was taken before the US civil war started and was informed of his emancipation by Union soldiers.
The intellectuals of black society in the 1930's loved Zora Neale Hurston ("Their Eyes Were Watching God") but despised, rejected and snuffed out her memory over "Barracoon"
She insisted on keeping the language real.
Howard University and many writers dictated what the masses should know. Mind you we are talking about scholars who deliberately kept Cudjo's  account, a historical document, out of the public discourse. 

Who can say how his story might have changed race relations in the US?

If you want to talk about EU/former colonial slavers we can do that too but they were out of the racket by then.. 
“The United Nations is the biggest joke of this century. If each one is trying to assert his own rights there, how can there be a United Nations?” UG Krishnamurti
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vanuatu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Jan 2019 at 07:02
Originally posted by franciscosan franciscosan wrote:


There is an idea that the genius suffers for his art, Van Gogh fits that fairly well, Nietzsche also, Zora Neale Huston too?  I don't know enough about her.
Its very interesting about her, she grew up in Eatonville,Florida which was an all black town. Her father was a minister and eventually the mayor. I can't help but think of Thomas Sowell explaining the unhealthy influence of black subculture. In Eatonville economic, social and spiritual elevation was most important. All of Hurston's grandparents were slaves who better to write Cudjo's story?

Van Gogh did suffer and he is my favorite, nothing human made him happy. I think Hurston probably suffered less than VG. She at least had moments of personal victory.


Edited by Vanuatu - 09 Jan 2019 at 07:03
“The United Nations is the biggest joke of this century. If each one is trying to assert his own rights there, how can there be a United Nations?” UG Krishnamurti
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote franciscosan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Jan 2019 at 11:17
I think the web of contacts in a small town can prevent people from falling too much, but also keep them from rising above the setting.  Part of that is people know you, and their limited expectation or imagination of who you are, keeps you in "your place."  I don't know if that is anything like to what Sowell refers.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vanuatu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Jan 2019 at 00:20
Originally posted by franciscosan franciscosan wrote:

I think the web of contacts in a small town can prevent people from falling too much, but also keep them from rising above the setting.  Part of that is people know you, and their limited expectation or imagination of who you are, keeps you in "your place."  I don't know if that is anything like to what Sowell refers.
I'm saying Hurston was a success, in part due to where she grew up. Sowell looks at educational and economic data he talks about harmful black sub culture such as gangster rap.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote caldrail Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Jan 2019 at 22:20
The last slave ship? Strictly speaking, the slave trade is alive and well.
http://www.unrv.com/forum/blog/31-caldrails-blog/
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vanuatu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Jan 2019 at 02:45
"The last slave ship? Strictly speaking, the slave trade is alive and well."

Yea that's true, sadly. The Clotilda (correct spelling) was known in its time to have transported slaves after the Atlantic slave trade was internationally banned. The Clotilda was intentionally sunk by one of the captains William Foster.

The federal government prosecuted Meaher and Foster in 1861 for violation of the act prohibiting the slave trade, but did not gain a conviction. They had no evidence from the ship nor its manifest. The men were tried in a federal court in Mobile, and the case was dismissed for lack of evidence. Historians believe the case was dropped by the federal government in part because of the outbreak of the American Civil War.

Because Captain Foster reported he burned and sank Clotilda[2] in the delta north of Mobile Bay, archaeological searches have continued into the 21st century for the wreck.[9] Several visible wrecks have been referred to by locals as the slave ship.

Main article: Africatown
  • Henry Louis Gates, Jr's Finding Your Roots, Season 4, Episode 9 (12 December 2017), showed census data for Mobile, and Captain William Foster's journal from the Clotilda, during a segment explaining the family history of Questlove, a drummer and producer, head of The Roots. His 3x great-grandparents Charles Lewis (b. ca.1820) and his wife Maggie (b. 1830) were among the slaves brought from West Africa on the Clotilda. Gates also discussed an article from The Tarboro Southerner, which reported on July 14, 1860 that 110 Africans had arrived in Mobile on Clotilda. A Pittsburgh Daily Post article of April 15, 1894 recounted the wager that Captain Timothy Meaher made in 1859 that he could smuggle in slaves within two years, and that he accomplished in 1860.[12]
“The United Nations is the biggest joke of this century. If each one is trying to assert his own rights there, how can there be a United Nations?” UG Krishnamurti
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