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International WarFunding and Weapon Supplies

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AksumVanguard View Drop Down
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    Posted: 29 Jun 2009 at 03:41
In the birth of the US it is ironic that US Governemt was in debt and owed money  to Banks of England the same country it had a war with.Of course the US also had to pay France back for its war supplies also,but it was given loans by the British Banks.

Moving on to later periods In the aftermath of  World War 1 Prussia and Austria were forced to pay its debt back to the France and Britian,this was all demanded as part  Treaty of Versailes and the Paris Peace Conference particularlly in the War Guilt Clause. The US did not want Germnay to feel the over bearing pressure of Britian's lloyd George and  French Clemenceau so the issued a Loan to Germany in reparations itself.

Lets not overlook weapons supplies to countries during ongoing conflicts.

*American made Sherman Tanks being  Israel in the Six Day War.

*The Famous Russian  Kalashnakovs used throughout the world but they are now being made by China becaise it cost more to be made in Russia.

*Russian export of several land anti-aircraft defense systems (zenith-missile complex TOR-M1) to Iran.


*STINGERSused in the Afghan-Russian 10 year war.

*SAMS used in the Bosnian War by Yugoslavs SA-2 and SA-6

http://international.husqvarna.com/node1002.aspx


Founded in 1689, Husqvarna is one of the oldest industrial companies in the world. Husqvarna begins as a weapons forge, with muskets as its speciality. Although production is largely manual, Husqvarna Gevärsfaktori (Husqvarna Rifle Factory) comes to be somewhat of a cradle of the Swedish high-precision industry. Under the leadership of Factory Manager Joachim Ehrenpreuss, production soon expands.

*http://www.ploughshares.ca/libraries/monitor/mons96a.html

Even Canada has been offering some good deals, notably on CF-5 fighter aircraft sold to Botswana and now possibly to the Philippines (see Cardfile, p. 7).

*http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/world/syria/cw.htm

Syria's principle suppliers of CBW production technology were reported to be large chemical brokerage houses in Holland, Switzerland, France, Austria and Germany.

The Syrian arsenal is said to be comprised mostly of large amounts of Sarin in addition to tabun, mustard gas and is reportedly producing and weaponizing VX.

*http://www.meforum.org/1824/augmenting-israels-qualitative-military-edge

Only in 1968, though, when President Lyndon Johnson approved the sale of F-4 Phantom fighters to Israel in the wake of the French decision to embargo arms sales to Israel, did Washington begin to implement a commitment to augment Israel's qualitative edge over its neighbors


With the 1981 sale of AWACS airborne radar systems to Saudi Arabia, the United States eroded the Israeli air force's edge over any hostile Arab coalition.

For example, the recently delivered advanced medium-range air-to-air missiles (AMRAAM) for the Saudi Arabian air force are less capable than the NATO-standard version provided to Israel.

http://www.wmdinsights.org/I24/I24_ME1_NewFrenchNuclear.htm

In December 2007, France and Libya followed the original memorandum of understanding in Tripoli with an accord signed in Paris outlining the sale of “one or more reactors” to Libya

*http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601091&refer=india&sid=aEaM.smH_ykY

India's government will soon invite bids to supply 126 fighter jets, valued by Lockheed Martin Corp. at about $9 billion, the biggest contract for combat planes in 15 years.

The government will build the majority of the jets in India through transfer of technology and buy the remainder from the U.S., Russian and European companies competing for the contract, the defense ministry said in an e-mailed statement.

*http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1970308/posts


The Rafale is a next-generation, multirole combat aircraft, and has been a flagship programme for France's arms industry, but has yet to find an export buyers.

Libya is the only country believed to be close to signing a contract for the Rafale, but Paris fears Washington could effectively veto the sale by threatening to penalise companies which provide hi-tech components to Tripoli.
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Styrbiorn View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Styrbiorn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Jun 2009 at 09:19
Originally posted by AksumVanguard AksumVanguard wrote:

Founded in 1689, Husqvarna is one of the oldest industrial companies in the world. Husqvarna begins as a weapons forge, with muskets as its speciality. Although production is largely manual, Husqvarna Gevärsfaktori (Husqvarna Rifle Factory) comes to be somewhat of a cradle of the Swedish high-precision industry. Under the leadership of Factory Manager Joachim Ehrenpreuss, production soon expands.




It might be worth mentioning that the most violent tools Husqvarna produces nowadays are chainsaws and lawn mowers.
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AksumVanguard View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AksumVanguard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Jun 2009 at 21:55
Originally posted by Styrbiorn Styrbiorn wrote:


It might be worth mentioning that the most violent tools Husqvarna produces nowadays are chainsaws and lawn mowers.



LOL.Interesting it is. But the purpose was to get a history of war supplies,weapons manufacturing of different countries,and their impact in international affairs. People such as Bernard Baruch who set up the War Industries Board to help give arms to the allies and manufacturing companies such as Bell Aircraft Corporation which produced P-63 in World War 2 is what I was trying to touch on. They are many companies who first started out making weapons and are now  producing other devices. It didn't necessarily have to be present with the with our current time.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote lirelou Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Jun 2009 at 23:12
I'm not sure I understand the premise. Is it: International war funding and weapons supplies cause wars? Or is it: Wars inevitably bring in international funding and weapons supplies except for those nations who have ample sources of funds and weapons?

Reference the Norinco AK-47s. Are the Russians now using such? I doubt it. It's just that as the Chinese produce them for a cheaper rate, any AK-47s are likely to be Norinco.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pikeshot1600 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Jun 2009 at 23:25
Just as a matter of information, the Russian army has, since the 1990s, been using a different Kalashnikov assault rifle, the AK-74.  This is a variant of the old AK-47 that used 7.62mm ammunition.  The AK-74 uses a 5.45mm round - more ammunition can be carried.
 
I do not see the Russian army farming out their war materiel production to potential adversaries.
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AksumVanguard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Jun 2009 at 05:47
Originally posted by lirelou lirelou wrote:

I'm not sure I understand the premise. Is it: International war funding and weapons supplies cause wars? Or is it: Wars inevitably bring in international funding and weapons supplies except for those nations who have ample sources of funds and weapons?



I was referring to the History War Funding and War Supplies between different countries in general.  It would be a bonus if anyone can explain the causes or the effects of the International Funding and Weapon Supplies between various  countries.But it is interesting to know which countries sought the help of foreign weapons or foreign funding period to change the course of a war or political climate.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote lirelou Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Jun 2009 at 13:48
Let's start with weapons. Generally, each belligerent party is obliged to field its own forces, organizing, arming, equipping, and training them. Since the playing field is seldom level, one or more parties is obliged to seek military assistance, to include weapons which place it on a par, or give an edge, over the opposing forces.  The totality of these arms, and proper training in how to use them, comes under the heading of "military assistance". Since there is never any such thing as a "free lunch", any belligerent party seeking military assistance must pay. If they cannot afford to do so from their treasury, or have immediate access to some form of payment such as "blood diamonds" they must obtain credit from the providing party, so you are now into foreign funding. That credit may be in the form of a promissory note, or a treaty provision allowing the creditor to receive post-conflict privileges (territorial concessions, mineral rights, "preferred nation" status in trade, etc.) The only exception to this is when the creditor nation views the conflict as vital to its own interests, and agrees to underwrite the expenses (or any part thereof) for assistance given as part of its own defense costs.

Historical examples:  

Purchasing superior weapons: Nguyen Dang Trong's (South Vietnam) purchase and use of Macau manufactured Portuguese artillery in their war with the Trinh (North Vietnam). And any number of early modern and modern wars.

Obtaining military assistance:
early: 
  1 - Nguyen use of French advisors in their war against the Tay Son and Trinh, agreeing to repay such by giving the French the use of one island, and certain proseltyzation privleges.
  2 - French support to American War for independence.
  3 - British support to Spain and Portugal during Napoleon's Peninsular Campaign.
modern:
  1 - Soviet support to Spanish Republic, during which the Soviets managed to take possession of the gold from the Spanish treasury, whose value greatly exceeded the cost of Soviet assistance.

Obtaining "free" or reduced cost military assistance: The "Lend Lease" policies of Franklin D. Roosevelt. Most of the third world "Cold War" conflicts, especially both Indochina Wars.

These are just off the top of my head. The list goes on and on, and could easily become an exercise ad absurdum. Good luck in your project.
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AksumVanguard View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AksumVanguard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Jul 2009 at 00:04
Originally posted by lirelou lirelou wrote:

Let's start with weapons. Generally, each belligerent party is obliged to field its own forces, organizing, arming, equipping, and training them. Since the playing field is seldom level, one or more parties is obliged to seek military assistance, to include weapons which place it on a par, or give an edge, over the opposing forces.  The totality of these arms, and proper training in how to use them, comes under the heading of "military assistance". Since there is never any such thing as a "free lunch", any belligerent party seeking military assistance must pay. If they cannot afford to do so from their treasury, or have immediate access to some form of payment such as "blood diamonds" they must obtain credit from the providing party, so you are now into foreign funding. That credit may be in the form of a promissory note, or a treaty provision allowing the creditor to receive post-conflict privileges (territorial concessions, mineral rights, "preferred nation" status in trade, etc.) The only exception to this is when the creditor nation views the conflict as vital to its own interests, and agrees to underwrite the expenses (or any part thereof) for assistance given as part of its own defense costs.

Historical examples:  

Purchasing superior weapons: Nguyen Dang Trong's (South Vietnam) purchase and use of Macau manufactured Portuguese artillery in their war with the Trinh (North Vietnam). And any number of early modern and modern wars.

Obtaining military assistance:
early: 
  1 - Nguyen use of French advisors in their war against the Tay Son and Trinh, agreeing to repay such by giving the French the use of one island, and certain proseltyzation privleges.
  2 - French support to American War for independence.
  3 - British support to Spain and Portugal during Napoleon's Peninsular Campaign.
modern:
  1 - Soviet support to Spanish Republic, during which the Soviets managed to take possession of the gold from the Spanish treasury, whose value greatly exceeded the cost of Soviet assistance.

Obtaining "free" or reduced cost military assistance: The "Lend Lease" policies of Franklin D. Roosevelt. Most of the third world "Cold War" conflicts, especially both Indochina Wars.

These are just off the top of my head. The list goes on and on, and could easily become an exercise ad absurdum. Good luck in your project.


Well I see your point of course you will  intervene into a foreign conflict without pre dtereming whether endorsing a certain political regime,party or Administration can reverebearte into a  unwanted affect on your own "country's soil itself".

One example is the when

When the Soviet Union invaded the previously controlled Japanese governemnt of Korea.The US sees this as an communist aggression and decides to move troops into South Korea in 1945 .They breifly reach a cease fire.The Soviets place Kim Il Sung in the North and the Allies place Syngman Rhee in the South Korea.The two states of Left Wing and Right Wing have been in a "Tug Of War" ever since.

United States sent arms- has lent Browning Auromatic RIfles,Thompson Machine Guns(Tommyguns),M4A3SHerman, Tanks,M36 TANKS,Douglas AD Airplane fights,B-26 Bombers and F-51 Mustangs.

The USSR has lent its support MIG-9 MIG-15,T-34 tanks, and PVA.


2 The United States lends its hand its Contras and aid to the FDN in  Nicuragua. The Latin American funded  ARDE which was Anti-Sandisista but against FDN. The UN eventually intervened and called the United Staes intervention against UN regulations.

3.The Ronald Reagan Administration sells the Iran guns and weapons to fund money of Contras inboth Nicuragua and Iran. They were also Saudi Investors who helped the Iranians purchase the Guns and Arms.

4.Cuban Revolution.The Batista regime and the Backing of Communist of Che and Castro in the July 26 Party in the cuban revolution.It is said the US did not supply the Batista regime adequately.

5.The Bay of Pigs in which the US did not give proper Air-Support,but it is rumored that they feared not only a launching of ICBM from the USSR but ICBM release from Cuba itself.
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