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Diogenes of Oenoanda, fragments

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franciscosan View Drop Down
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    Posted: 10 Apr 2018 at 22:40
"Diogenes of Oenoanda, the Fragments, by C. W. Chilton, University of Hull, 1971" 
"This work deals with the remains of a unique inscription set up in remote part of Lycia around A.D. 200 to proclaim all and sundry the doctrines and message of Epicurus."

So, basically this official Diogenes of this small town in a corner of the Roman Empire decided to engrave Epicurean treatises on a wall.  The remains of which have been discovered and recorded.  Some of the writings were known from other sources, such as the "Lives of Eminent Philosophers" by Diogenes Laertius (another Diogenes), but some are not otherwise known.

The Epicureans had the reputation in the later Roman Empire as atheists, they believed that there were gods, but the gods were not involved in everyday life.  That made them atheists in the pagan view of things.  Christians were also sometimes considered atheists in another way, not recognizing the gods.

Besides Diogenes of Oenoanda, and Diogenes Laertius, there are the "Vatican Sayings" (from the Vatican library), there is also Lucretius Rerum Natura, (On the Nature of Things) which I believe only survived antiquity in one manuscript.  And then there are the fragments of Philodemus from the scrolls of Herculaneum.

I am not that big on Epicureanism, but I think that it is pretty cool that some minor official who was an Epicurean set up the ancient equivalents of bill boards, advertising the good word.

An American designed a computer imagery program to read such things as badly charred scrolls without
unrolling them (and destroying them).  One only has to wait until the Italians give him access to the surviving scrolls of Herculaneum, don't hold your breath.  Some scrolls have already been unrolled with limited success, revealing an Epicurean theme (Philodemus) to the library, but what else is there, nobody really knows.  Plus other parts of the library may still lie buried.
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franciscosan View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar


Joined: 09 Feb 2015
Location: Littleton CO
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Points: 3233
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote franciscosan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Apr 2018 at 20:52
Epicurus may have been the most revered philosopher in antiquity, and also the most reviled philosopher of antiquity.  He was born nine years after the death of Plato, and before the career of Alexander of Macedon.  Whereas, the stoics had the stoa (the porch), the Aristotelians had the 'walk-way' (peripatetic), the Platonists had the Academy, the Epicureans had the Garden.
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