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Denisovan DNA

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franciscosan View Drop Down
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    Posted: 11 May 2019 at 11:38
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Vanuatu View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vanuatu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 May 2019 at 11:02
Denisovans- Maybe the oldest hominin fossil on the Tibetan Plateau! The fossil shows a relation to the group found at the Denisovan cave. The analysis also shows Neanderthal and Denisovan features. The earliest possible date for this fossil would be among the oldest at the cave.

Denisovans were an extinct group of hominins that were close relatives of Neanderthals. They are known primarily from a handful of fossil fragments found at Denisova Cave in Siberia, and from genetic clues that linger in the DNA of people across Asia.

But new fossil evidence reveals that these ancient human relatives also inhabited the Tibetan Plateau, the tallest and widest plateau on Earth, known as "the Roof of the World."


franciscosan-thanks for the heads up!


Edited by Vanuatu - 12 May 2019 at 02:10
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please." - Mark Twain
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Sep 2017 at 16:58
Vanuatu

I don't understand the chemical theory, but the basic investigation of ancient DNA has been centred around mammalian skeletal remains, including teeth, as mentioned in the article.

As it relates to Hominems, some of these remains have been very small, in the case of Denisovans, for example, the DNA was extracted from a childs little finger (pinky), as I understand it.

There has been study into ancient faeces, but I've not seen any recent results as to human faeces, including Neanderthals.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vanuatu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Sep 2017 at 15:15
Quote I'd venture to suggest that the DNA was found in ancient faeces, rather than the soil itself. That's been the case in some other sites I believe.

You understand this stuff -also *see the findings about time not being a correlation with ancient DNA necessarily.
Here is the report FYI.


In total, our meta-analysis and model are necessarily focused on mammalian hard tissue (n = 169 out of 185 datasets) given dataset availability. As more datasets are generated from diverse systems and tissue types, we expect further refinement of these general findings to reflect a more nuanced understanding behind the specific drivers of DNA diagenesis and factors underlying preservation. For example, DNA is integrated into hair during programmed cell death and keratinization leading to some amount of immediate shearing which might affect downstream processes (67). Thus ancient DNA in hair might warrant a modified set of expectations for preservation relative to bony tissue given a certain background environment. Recent experimentation comparing tooth cementum and petrous bone DNA characteristics reinforces the necessity of integrating sample type information in assessing DNA degradation in the future (65). Finally, the relationships between biomolecule preservation and the microenvironment of sample deposition (e.g. soil pH, mineral content, sample depth and aerobic activity) bear significant further investigation as more datasets become available.

Edited by Vanuatu - 05 Sep 2017 at 15:17
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Sep 2017 at 16:41
Originally posted by Vanuatu Vanuatu wrote:

Scientists are pulling DNA from soil where no human remains were found. This kind of gives me chill!
Is DNA- diffusing- rather than breaking down?

When they searched for DNA fragments specific to hominins — a precursor of modern humans — they found what they were after: nine samples from four archaeological sites produced enough hominin DNA for further analysis. In eight of the samples, they found DNA from Neanderthals, and in one site in Russia they found DNA from a Denisovan, the Asian cousins of Neanderthals.

“It was a surprise,” said Slon. “We thought [hominin DNA] would be a very small minority in the samples, which was the case, and we were surprised by how well this worked.”


Very interesting, as Maxwell Smart used to say.

I'd venture to suggest that the DNA was found in ancient faeces, rather than the soil itself. That's been the case in some other sites I believe.

I know that in the UK, archeologists have spent time analysing the contents of toilet sites of old castles etc.






Edited by toyomotor - 02 Sep 2017 at 16:42
It's not that I was born in Ireland,
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vanuatu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Sep 2017 at 13:25
Scientists are pulling DNA from soil where no human remains were found. This kind of gives me chill!
Is DNA- diffusing- rather than breaking down?

When they searched for DNA fragments specific to hominins — a precursor of modern humans — they found what they were after: nine samples from four archaeological sites produced enough hominin DNA for further analysis. In eight of the samples, they found DNA from Neanderthals, and in one site in Russia they found DNA from a Denisovan, the Asian cousins of Neanderthals.

“It was a surprise,” said Slon. “We thought [hominin DNA] would be a very small minority in the samples, which was the case, and we were surprised by how well this worked.”



Edited by Vanuatu - 02 Sep 2017 at 13:26
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please." - Mark Twain
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